Witness & Work: FullSoul’s Intern’s Experience in Uganda

I was in Uganda’s Mukono Health Centre IV the first time I saw a woman give birth. The hospital’s delivery suite was about the size of a single private room in a Canadian hospital, yet at that moment it hosted 1 midwife, 4 nurses, 4 occupied beds, medical supplies, and myself. The woman’s delivery was difficult and as I watched, I experienced a rollercoaster of emotions – worry, amazement, relief, and, finally, elation. During the delivery, the midwives and nurses worked in a well-practiced manner, improvising when certain materials, such as forceps or surgical scissors, were not available. I was surprisingly unfazed by the conditions; I had already mentally accepted that hospitals in Uganda are often insufficiently funded. However, I was shocked by the implications of this reality. For the first time, I saw what it meant for a woman to deliver a baby without adequate medical facilities, privacy, or support.

Alyna at Mukono

FullSoul Intern, Alyna Moosabhoy, interviews the head midwife at Mukono Health Centre IV, one of the locations of the FullSoul Kits.

Unnecessary delays are believed to be a significant cause of otherwise preventable maternal deaths and they occur all too often when hospitals are not properly equipped. I travelled to Uganda this past summer to evaluate FullSoul Canada’s Maternal Medical Kit project, which supplies essential delivery tools to under-funded rural Ugandan hospitals. Throughout my internship, I recognized first-hand the relevance and significance of the work FullSoul does. A large portion of my role entailed listening and observing. From site visit observations, audits, and interviews with healthcare workers, I gained insights on the specific needs and challenges of our partner hospitals regarding maternal health. Simultaneously, through conversations with newfound Ugandan friends I furthered my understanding of the context of FullSoul’s work, as we discussed the fundamentals of national politics, economics, and healthcare.

FullSoul partners with local stakeholders and institutions to practically and appreciably improve maternal healthcare and decrease the number of preventable maternal deaths in a country that has one of the world’s highest maternal mortality rates. Using the DMIAC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve and Control) approach, I evaluated the efficacy of the program’s implementation, the details of which can be found in the published Evaluation Report. I am grateful to have gained insight on the state of maternal healthcare in Uganda from my internship, as it now enables me to contribute informed ideas on how FullSoul may best progress and grow. I have taken this opportunity to work with an organization that saves lives by implementing a feasible solution to the immediate problem many rural Ugandan hospitals face: lack of basic medical tools. I also developed personal and professional skills, and was immersed in a spectacular cultural experience. I worked alongside local Ugandans, some of whom became my closest friends. I learned of cultural differences that challenged my perceptions, beliefs, and values. In such a beautiful country, surrounded by lush greenery, I was welcomed by its people and free to discover its many charms; ultimately I had a uniquely wonderful two months.

In the two short months I was there, I came to love Uganda. I cherish my time there and the people I met, and I hope to return soon. In the meantime, although I am back in Canada my journey with FullSoul has not ended. FullSoul does great work and I can clearly envision its bright future, which I am excited to work towards with the rest of the team.

Alyna Moosabhoy served as a FullSoul Intern in Uganda for May-July 2017, evaluating the kits and the needs surrounding maternal health in these facilities. She continues to work with FullSoul in their evaluation, development and implementation of projects since returning to Canada.